Originality and Plagiarism

  • When an author submits a manuscript to Asia Digital Art and Design Association (ADADA), the manuscript must be an original work. Furthermore, if they have used the work or words of others, the author must appropriately cite the article. Publications that have been influential in determining the digital design and art of the work reported in the manuscript should also be cited. Plagiarism takes many forms, from “passing off” another’s paper as the author’s own, to copying or paraphrasing substantial parts of another’s paper (without attribution), to claiming results from research conducted by others. Plagiarism, in all its forms, constitutes unethical publishing behavior and is unacceptable.

Multiple, duplicate, redundant or concurrent submission/publication

  • Authors must not submit the same work, in whole or in part, to two places of publication at the same time, or at any time while the manuscript is under review at ADADA. It is also improper for an Author to submit a manuscript describing essentially the same research to more than one place of publication unless it is a resubmission of a manuscript rejected for or withdrawn from publication. Thus, an Author may not submit to ADADA a work that is in whole or in part under review elsewhere, nor submit to another publication outlet a work that is in whole or in part under review at ADADA. The manuscript must not have been previously published or accepted for publication elsewhere, either in whole (including book chapters) or in part (including paragraphs of text or exhibits), whether in English or another language. The only exception to the “originality” rule is a conference proceedings paper, where the paper is work in progress toward the manuscript submitted to ADADA. The author must inform the ADADA Office of the conference proceedings paper, either in advance of or at the time of submission to the Journal, and, if requested by the ADADA Office, send the conference proceedings paper to the ADADA Editorial Committee member handling the manuscript. The publication of some kinds of articles (such as clinical guidelines, translations) in more than one journal is sometimes justifiable, provided that certain conditions are met. The authors and editors of the journals concerned must agree to the secondary publication, which must reflect the same data and interpretation of the primary document. The primary reference must be cited in the secondary publication. If the manuscript contains materials that overlap with work that is previously published, that is in the press, or that is under consideration for publication elsewhere, the author must cite this work in the manuscript. The author must also inform the ADADA Office of the related work and, if requested, send the manuscript to the ADADA Editorial Committee member.

Conflict of Interest

  • Authors should avoid conflicts of interest. At the earliest stage possible (generally by submitting a disclosure form at the time of submission and including a statement in the manuscript), disclose any conflicts of interest that might be construed to influence the results or their interpretation in the manuscript. Examples of potential conflicts of interest that should be disclosed include financial ones such as honoraria, educational grants or other funding, participation in speakers’ bureaus, membership, employment, consultancies, stock ownership, or other equity interest, and paid expert testimony or patent-licensing arrangements, as well as non-financial ones such as personal or professional relationships, affiliations, knowledge or beliefs in the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript. All sources of financial support for the work should be disclosed (including the grant number or other reference number, if any). A conflict of interest is some fact known to a participant in the publication process that, if revealed later, would make a reasonable reader feel misled or deceived (or an Author, Reviewer, or Editor feel defensive). Conflicts of interest may influence the judgment of Authors, Reviewers, and Editors. Possible conflicts often are not immediately apparent to others. The perception of a conflict of interest is nearly as crucial as an actual conflict since both erode trust. All such interests (or their absence) should be declared in writing by the Authors upon submission of the manuscript. If any are declared, they should be published with the article. If there is doubt about whether a circumstance represents a conflict, it should be disclosed, so that Editors may assess its significance. Any queries about possible conflicts of interest should be addressed to the ADADA Office or the ADADA Chief Editorial Committee. Authors should disclose in the manuscript’s Acknowledgements any financial or other substantive conflicts of interest that might be construed to influence the results or interpretation of their manuscript. All sources of financial support for the project should be disclosed. Authors may withhold the names of specific sponsors if they provide an adequate and full description of the sponsor’s nature and interest. Examples of possible conflicts of interest include: (1) one of the Authors is at the same institution as the nominated Editor or Reviewer; (2) one of the Authors was a member of the Editor or Reviewer’s dissertation committee or vice versa; or (3) one of the Authors, and the Editor or Reviewer, are currently Co-Authors on another manuscript or have been Co-Authors on a manuscript within the past two years. Authors should not nominate individuals whom they know have already read and provided comments on the manuscript or a previous version of the manuscript since such knowledge would automatically violate the double-blind review process.

Acknowledgement of sources

  • Authors should ensure that they have properly acknowledged the work of others, and should also cite publications that have been influential in determining the nature of the reported work. Information obtained privately (from the conversation, correspondence, or discussion with third parties) must not be used or reported without explicit, written permission from the source. Authors should not use information obtained in the course of providing confidential services, such as refereeing manuscripts or grant applications unless they have obtained the explicit written permission of the author (s) of the work involved in these services.

Hazards and human or animal subjects

  • If the work involves chemicals, procedures, or equipment that have any unusual hazards inherent in their use, the authors must clearly identify these in the manuscript. If the work involves the use of animals or human participants, the authors should ensure that all procedures were performed in compliance with relevant laws and institutional guidelines and that the appropriate institutional committee(s) has approved them; the manuscript should contain a statement to this effect. Authors should also include a statement in the manuscript that informed consent was obtained for experimentation with human participants. The privacy rights of human participants must always be observed. Authors have a responsibility to preserve and protect the privacy, dignity, well-being, and freedom of human subjects and research participants. Informed consent should be sought from all human subjects, and if confidentiality or anonymity is requested, it should be honored. Manuscripts involving human subjects (surveys, simulations, interviews) should comply with the relevant Human Subject Protocol requirements at the author’s university.

Double-Blind Review

  • ADADA follows a double-blind review process, whereby the Authors do not know Reviewers and vice versa. Authors should respect the confidentiality of the review process and should not reveal themselves to Reviewers, and vice versa. For example, the manuscript should not include any self-revealing information that would identify the author to a Reviewer.
  • Authors should not post their submitted manuscript (including working papers and prior drafts) on websites where potential Reviewers could quickly discover it.
  • Authors should not nominate as Editor or Reviewer individuals whom they know have already read and provided comments on the manuscript or a previous version of the manuscript since such knowledge would automatically violate the double-blind review process.

Accuracy

  • Authors have the ultimate responsibility for all materials included in a manuscript submitted to ADADA. Authors are obligated to present an accurate account of the research performed as well as an objective discussion of the significance of the research.
  • Authors should report their findings fully and should not omit data that are relevant within the context of the research question(s). Results should be reported whether they support or contradict expected outcomes. Authors should take particular care to present relevant qualifications to their research or to the findings and interpretations of them. Underlying assumptions, theories, methods, measures, and research designs relevant to the findings and interpretations of their work should be disclosed.
  • The manuscript should contain sufficient detail and references to permit peers with access to the same dataset to repeat the work.
  • If an author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in his/her work, the author should promptly notify the journal Editor and cooperate with the Editor to retract or correct the paper. If the Editor or the publisher learns from a third party that a published work contains a significant error, the author should promptly retract or correct the manuscript or provide evidence to the Editor of the correctness of the original paper.

Authorship of the manuscript

  • Only persons who meet these authorship criteria should be listed as authors in the manuscript as they must be able to take public responsibility for the content: (i) made significant contributions to the conception, design, execution, data acquisition, or analysis/interpretation of the study, (ii) drafted the manuscript or revised it critically for important intellectual content, (iii) have seen and approved the final version of the paper and agreed to its submission for publication. All persons who made substantial contributions to the work reported in the manuscript (such as technical help, writing and editing assistance, general support) but who do not meet the criteria for authorship must not be listed as an author, but should be acknowledged in the “Acknowledgements” section after their written permission to be named as been obtained. The corresponding author should ensure that all appropriate co-authors (according to the above definition) and no inappropriate co-authors are included in the author list and verify that all co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the manuscript and agreed to its submission for publication.

Copyright Law

  • Authors should check their manuscripts for possible breaches of copyright law (e.g., where permissions are needed for quotations, artwork, or tables taken from other publications) and secure the necessary permissions before submission.
  • Authors should avoid anything in the text of the manuscript that might be actionable, such as defamation. Authors should avoid using sexist and biased language that could be interpreted as denigrating to ethnic or other groups; for example, plural rather than single pronouns (“they” rather than “he”) is recommended.

Timeliness

  • Authors should be prompt with their manuscript revisions. If an Author cannot meet the deadline given, the author should contact the ADADA Editorial Committee member as soon as possible to determine whether a more extended period or withdrawal from the review process should be chosen.